Blog

The Metal Stamping Process

The Metal Stamping Process

When it comes to metal stamping, the process is not a new process. It’s history can be dated all the way back to the 1800s, and this was during the type when bicycle parts were being mass-produced. However, the metal stamping systems and other resources that were being used were not as advanced as they are today. The metal stamping systems during that time were still able to produce a variety of effective and efficient parts and components.

What is Tube Hydroforming? The History and Background Explained

What is Tube Hydroforming? The History and Background Explained

First developed in the late 1940s and early 1950s, tube hydroforming is the process by which pressurized fluid, either hydraulic fluid or water, is used to expand and shape metal tubes into the contours of a die. Since there are no welded seams, tubular hydroforming can be used to fabricate structural parts that are lighter, more rigid, and stronger than stamped sheet metal.

Deep Drawing Continues To Be A Popular Method

Deep Drawing Continues To Be A Popular Method

When you think about metal forming, what do you generally think about it? It will not be a surprise if one of your first thoughts is deep drawing. Deep drawing is one of the most used and popular methods when it comes to metal forming; deep drawing is one of the best ways to form a metal sheet into any type of shape you can think of.

Are You Using Hydroformed Products

Are You Using Hydroformed Products

Are you using hydroformed products? Many of the items used by people every day are created through a process called deep draw hydroforming. Next time you are at these places or with individuals who use these items, look closely at them and see if you can see why hydroforming was the best way to create them.

Friction Stir Welding: Its Applications and Advantages for the Automotive Industry

Friction Stir Welding: Its Applications and Advantages for the Automotive Industry

Friction stir welding (FSW) is a relatively new welding process that was invented at The Welding Institute in Cambridge, UK in 1991. FSW is a solid-state joining process that uses frictional heat combined with accurately directed forging pressure to produce high integrity welded joints for extruded or wrought aluminum. The process can also be used to join copper, titanium, and certain alloys. This automated frictional welding process is more robust than other joining processes and is a good fit for industries that must employ high-volume production, such as the automotive industry.

Tube Hydroforming Will Continue To Have A Place In The Industry

Tube Hydroforming Will Continue To Have A Place In The Industry

While it may still be seen as one of the newer methods in the industry, especially when compared to the conventional or traditional stamping processes, tube hydroforming continues to have a large impact in the automotive industry and a host of other industries. Why is tube hydroforming having such a great impact in these industries? Why is tube hydroforming a popular choice over the older techniques?