Archive for the Metal Fabrication Category

Creating Parts With Deep Draw Hydroforming

Creating Parts With Deep Draw Hydroforming

All the parts that are created are not created in the same manner, and this means they will not all be created equal. When we are discussing hydroforming and sheet metal forming processes, there are various options that will be laid on the table. Hydroforming is a process that will present an effective way for you to produce deep drawn parts and components of a low volume. 

American Hydroformers: Metal Forming

American Hydroformers: Metal Forming

Hydroforming and metal spinning are two of the most efficient and effective processes that are used to produce a variety of high-grade, durable metal components and parts. At American Hydroformers, we produce our parts and components in a variety of measurements and shapes, and it can depend on the needs that the client has specified. 

Hydraulic Bulge Test in Hydroforming

Hydraulic Bulge Test in Hydroforming

Hydraulic bulge test in hydroforming. As with all operations creating shapes and parts out of metal, the stress and strain must be tested to ensure safety. If a company is creating car roofs using hydroforming out of sheets of metal, hydraulic bulge testing can help determine if the car roof can take the required stress and strain of driving and even accidents. 

3 Myths About Deep Draw Metal Stamping

3 Myths About Deep Draw Metal Stamping

Over the course of many years, there have been numerous misconceptions about deep draw metal stamping and how the deep draw process works. For those who are unfamiliar with the deep draw metal stamping process, this is a manufacturing process that remains in competition with others in order to create a product that has a few similarities or one that is completely the same. However, the deep draw metal stamping process has a few major differences that separate it from the other methods and processes. 

What Is Friction Stir Welding? American Hydroformers

What Is Friction Stir Welding? American Hydroformers

The welding technique, friction stir welding, was developed almost 30 years ago in 1991. Although it was invented many years ago, it has seen a high rise in demand over the past few years. One of the main reasons that friction stir welding has seen such a massive increase is due to the rising demand for greater strength and durability in applications.

Friction Stir Welding: What is it and How Does it Work?

Friction Stir Welding: What is it and How Does it Work?

Lauded as the most significant innovation in metal joining in the last decade, Friction Stir Welding (FSW) introduces a solid-state joining process that is environmentally friendly, versatile, and energy efficient. FSW outperforms conventional fusion welding by joining aerospace aluminum alloys, and other metallic alloys, that are high-strength. The significance of this advancement is that aerospace aluminum alloys, like 2XXX and 7XXX series, have been classified as virtually non-weldable with conventional welding processes because of porosity and microstructure solidification behavior. Resistance welding can be performed on aluminum alloys, however, surface preparation has to be performed, which is expensive and surface oxide becomes a problem.

Where Would We Be Without High-Temperature Metal Gas Forming?

Where Would We Be Without High-Temperature Metal Gas Forming?

Although your average American probably has not heard of high metal gas forming, that does not mean they have not taken advantage of products made possible (or made better) through it. Those of us in the industry know better. We recognize that the vast majority of us would lead less comfortable and convenient lives without high-temperature metal gas forming.