The Friction Stir Welding Process: What Is It?

The Friction Stir Welding Process: What Is It?

The solid-state welding process in which the materials that are used for welding never go over the require melting points is known as friction-stir welding. This process requires heat to be generated during each point of contact that is used to join the materials together. During the friction-stir welding process, a spinning tool is imposed on a piece of work. The spinning tool is put through a downward force and turning over to the weld direction.

This type of contact creates grinding heat between the weld materials and the tool, and this will eventually cause the weld material to deform. Due to the high amount of pressure and the high temperature that needs to be applied, these materials will be bonded solidly. Unlike the other types of welding processes that exist today, this friction stir welding process does not need to use gases or filler materials. The friction stir welding process will also not require a high input of energy like the other welding processes.

Some of the factors that will have an impact on friction stir welding include the following:

  • the flow of material
  • the depths of the tools that are used
  • the speed of the tools that are used
  • rotation
  • the generation of the flow of heat

Three of the materials that are better suited for the process include the following:

  • Copper
  • Aluminum
  • Titanium

Friction Stir Welding

Friction stir welding process has received a significant amount of interest in various industries that work with aluminum. Some of the other advantages of this method include the ability to produce longer lengths of welds without the need to melt any of the base materials. The friction stir welding process is being used in a variety of industries, including the automotive industry, aerospace industry, aircraft industry, and more.

For more information on this process, please do not hesitate to contact us today.

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