Posts Tagged deep draw hydroforming

Deep Drawing Continues To Be A Popular Method

Deep Drawing Continues To Be A Popular Method

When you think about metal forming, what do you generally think about it? It will not be a surprise if one of your first thoughts is deep drawing. Deep drawing is one of the most used and popular methods when it comes to metal forming; deep drawing is one of the best ways to form a metal sheet into any type of shape you can think of.

What Is Tube Hydroforming: Improving Auto Safety

What Is Tube Hydroforming: Improving Auto Safety

Most individuals are trying to cut costs and save money. One way is to purchase a fuel-efficient car. But most of those cars are compact cars and on the road with larger vehicles, safety can be a concern. Of most concern is getting hit and the car collapsing or trapping an individual inside the vehicle. Automobile manufacturers are always looking for ways to improve the safety of all vehicles and at the same time not make vehicles heavier.

3 Myths About Deep Draw Metal Stamping

3 Myths About Deep Draw Metal Stamping

Over the course of many years, there have been numerous misconceptions about deep draw metal stamping and how the deep draw process works. For those who are unfamiliar with the deep draw metal stamping process, this is a manufacturing process that remains in competition with others in order to create a product that has a few similarities or one that is completely the same. However, the deep draw metal stamping process has a few major differences that separate it from the other methods and processes. 

What Is Deep Draw Hydroforming?

What Is Deep Draw Hydroforming?

For many years, it has been understood that metal stamping or pressing is an effective and economical method for manufacturing parts that are quite complex. Although there may be a higher price to pay in the beginning to manufacture tooling, deep draw hydroforming can be a quicker and cheaper alternative to other processes, including fabrication. Deep draw hydroforming goes beyond what other methods can do in order to produce parts that are deeper and/or longer.

What Should You Know About Deep Draw Hydroforming?

What Should You Know About Deep Draw Hydroforming?

Deep draw hydroforming is constantly in competition with other types of hydroforming processes that are able to create the same products or similar products. However, deep draw hydroforming has multiple differences that set it apart from the other processes.

We understand the choices are not always easy to make, but there are many hydrofroming professionals and experts are available to provide information for anyone who has been thinking about the deep draw hydroforming method. With so much information being shared, there is always a chance that false information will be shared. 

Are You Aware Of These Deep Draw Hydroforming Myths And Misconceptions?

Are You Aware Of These Deep Draw Hydroforming Myths And Misconceptions?

Deep draw hydroforming is in competition with a variety of other manufacturing processes that are used to create things we use on a daily basis. However, there are several differences when it comes to deep draw hydroforming that sets this process apart from the other manufacturing processes. Deciding the right choice can certainly be confusing, and you will likely hear different opinions and advice as you are considering the right method for your needs. Unfortunately, some of those opinions and advice will be based on myths and misconceptions.

American Hydroformers: The advantages of deep draw hydroforming

American Hydroformers: The advantages of deep draw hydroforming

If you need a lightweight metal part with a depth larger than the radius, deep draw hydroforming is the way to go. This versatile process makes lightweight, durable parts that are deeper and more accurate than traditionally stamped parts.

To create a part with deep draw hydroforming, metal sheets are drawn into a die and shaped by a punch. Unlike with a stamp, these pieces can be redrawn to reshape it as much as it needs to be. Hydroforming has been around since 1899, but the process really took off when it was adopted by the automotive industry in the early 1900s. Since then, manufacturers continue to use deep draw hydroforming to make high-quality products. Here are some of the advantages of this process.

Deep Draw Hydroforming Aids in Medical Device Manufacturing

Deep Draw Hydroforming Aids in Medical Device Manufacturing

It has long been established that deep draw hydroforming is a technology that has staying power. The process in which deep draw hydorforming follows makes it a powerful solution for a variety of manufacturing industries, helping to set a future path for how many things are made.

It was recently reported recently that deep draw hydoforming is now fostering the production of medical devices. Stating that the process was “ideal” for production of this type.

From the article:

An innate ability to foster rapid prototyping, inexpensive product development, and low-volume, high-mix production makes sheet hydroforming ideal for medical device manufacturing.

Additionally, according to the report, deep draw hydroforming brings several unique advantages to the production of medical device fabrication, no matter the material in which it is made (aluminum or steel).

– Tooling advantages. Parts can be manufactured quicker and with less lead time. Meaning that, along side various structural benefits, parts require less manufacturing time after the prototype design is established.

– Improved, stronger parts. Because the tooling process allows devices to be made of materials that work together mutually and beneficially, parts can be produced out of materials that better suit the needs of the user.

– A wider range of part designs. Parts that would normally require multiple, complex angles (and even negative angles) are formed easily.

– Skilled labor not required. Because of the artisan-ship and skill that once went into sheet hydroforming, it was as much an art as a trade. But as the article points out:

Modern systems allow for precise control over both the diaphragm pressure and, on deep draw models, punch position… This infinite control… along with the ability to save proven recipes for future access, leads to rapid new part development and greater part consistency due to the repeatable nature of the process.

– Forming simulations hit benchmark. Forming simulation suites make the process more simple and user-friendly on the front end. Like looking at a recipe and adding ingredients.

Sheet and deep draw hydroforming assist in adding an advantage to a broad spectrum of industries, and we’re proud to be on the cutting edge of the future alongside it. For more information on how we can help you, please contact us any time.

Deep Draw Hydroforming Innovations

Deep Draw Hydroforming Innovations

September brought glad tidings in the world of deep draw hydroforming. Not only have power player Beckwood Press Company announced improvements in the area of low-volume, high-mix production, but it was also confirmed that they will be exhibiting and presenting educational sessions at the upcoming FABTECH 2014.

Innovations

While working to solve a problem for one of their clients, they recently built and installed a Triform deep draw press that featured a 25″ diameter forming area, 10,000 PSI of pressure, and a 12″ draw capacity. The client is pleased, and Beckwood is proud of its work:

“We are proud to announce the installation, and successful training and ramp up of another Triform deep draw hydroforming application this year,” said Beckwood President, Jeffrey Debus. “Our engineering team provided a machine with advanced forming capability, faster forming time, and a reduced reliance on skilled labor; and our support team provided the training and assistance the client needed to get their operators up to speed and working with the press on an expert level within days of installation” (Today’s Medical Developments)

FABTECH 2014 Sessions

It was announced through the PR Web that Beckwood would bring their industry-leading designs and Triform expertise to FABTECH 2014 in Atlanta, Georgia. In addition to giving an hour-long session, Beckwood and Triform will be available in the exhibition hall, where they will display their new 30-ton custom deep draw hydroforming hydraulic press, featuring some of the latest control technologies that they have developed.

Parties interested in attending the event should seek more information directly from FABTECH here.

For more information about deep draw hydroforming or anything else hydroforming related, please feel free to contact us.

Deep Draw Hydroforming Process

Deep Draw Hydroforming Process

What is Sheet Metal Hydroforming?

Sheet metal hydroforming is a metal forming process that is achieved by applying force to sheet metal to alter its overall geometric shape as opposed to added or subtracting any materials. The applied force used in production alters the sheet metal’s yield strength, causing the metal to bend but not to cause failure. Sheet metal can be bent into many complex shapes by using this process.

A great example of how some sheet  hydroformers uses this deep draw hydroforming technique is below.

Deep Drawing

Deep draw hydroforming is a process of sheet metal hydroforming similar to most techniques, but differs in execution. Sheet metal is stretched and bent into a desired shape. This is done when a tool pushes down onto sheet metal, forcing it into a die cavity in a pre-set shape. The tensile force causes the metal to form into a cup shape.

The deep drawing process begins with a blank, a blank holder, a punch, and a die. The blank, or piece of sheet metal, is placed into the blank holder over top of the die. The cavity of which is the shape of the desired part. Then, a tool called a punch moves downward onto the blank and “draws,” or bends/stretches the part into the desired shape, but does not alter its strength.

The parts can have a variety of cross sections, and can have straight, tapered, or even curved walls, but the most common shapes are cylinders and rectangles. The deep draw process is most commonly used with ductile metals like aluminum, copper, and a mild steel. Some examples of deep draw parts are automotive bodies/frames, fuel tanks, cans, cups, kitchen sinks, and pots and pans.

For additional information on how we can help you contact us any time.