Posts Tagged metal fabrication

Debunking 3 Metal Stamping Myths

Debunking 3 Metal Stamping Myths

In the manufacturing industry, there are multiple processes that can compete with one another and still create the same products or products that are similar. The metal stamping process is one of the processes that can compete. This process does have a variety of differences that can separate it from the other competing processes.

Metal Stamping Keeping Up with Demand Through Innovation

Metal Stamping Keeping Up with Demand Through Innovation

Not to be outdone by all of the advancements in hydroforming and welding, metal stamping continues to stand up for its respected and trusted method. Thanks, in part, to those manufacturers whom rely so heavily on it as a method of production.

This time, evidence of metal stamping’s forward march in engineering comes out of the Land Down Under, from engineers at Bestech Australia who recently announced two new optical micrometers, that are specifically

designed to measure the roundness and diameter of stainless steel metal stampings to micrometre accuracies in a full installation.

The two meters, named Micro-Epsilon optoCONTROL 2600, offer complete automatic measurements of “cylindrical, ground stainless steel metal stamping application.” With schematics , angles, and density at three separate calibrations within an accuracy of ±2 µm.

Both of the micrometers are connected through a laser line, which helps to prove reliability in roundness and strength. Then an encoder performs rotations designed to impress a sharp edge upon the blank, with rotations “assigned to the respective angle position.” After which, it measures and records all mathematical calculations and calibrations.

The Micro-Epsilon optoCONTROL 2600 is controlled by a sophisticated computer system that calculates measurements and solves problems in design all at once.

Its telecentric lenses and filters make it impervious to ambient lighting pollution, so that edges and calculated values (as well as diameter measurements) are precise and accurate.

Further advantages include a CCD camera that aids in producing high-resolution measurements, while LED technology means there are fewer working parts, meaning a longer operational life and a wear-free function.

As the need for metal stamping remains evident in manufacturing and industries around the world, so, too, will the inventiveness and innovation from engineers who strive to keep it relevant.

For more information on how we can help you, or additional information on the services we offer, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

The Budding New Technique of Friction Stir Welding

The Budding New Technique of Friction Stir Welding

A relatively young technique in the field of welding, friction stir welding was invented then scientifically proven as a viable method in December of 1991. By definition it is a ‘solid-state joining process,’ meaning that the material being used for welding is not melted. This process employs the use of a third body tool to join together the two facing surfaces.

The process starts with heat being generated between the friction stir welding tool and material, which leads to a softened region. The tool then mechanically mixes the metals between the two pieces at the place of the joint. The softened metal can then be joined by pressure, supplied by the welding tool. This process is described as being much like joining pieces of clay or dough. Friction stir welding is excellent for items requiring superior hold strength without the need of a post-weld heat treatment.

There are several advantages that friction stir welding has been observed to have over traditional fusion welding. Some of these include;

  • Free range operation positions (horizontal, vertical, etc.) because there is no weld pool.
  • No consumables.
  • Easily automated on simple milling machines due to lower set up costs and less training.
  • Improved safety due to the absence of toxic fumes or the spatter of molten welding materials.
  • Reduced impact on the environment.

As with the advantages, a few disadvantages also go along with the friction stir welding process. A few examples of the disadvantages are;

  • An exit hole is left in the metal when the tool is withdrawn.
  • Less flexibility than whats found in manual and arch welding processes.
  • Often slower than fusion welding techniques, however this can be offset if a smaller number of welding passes are required.

Despite being a relatively new process, friction stir welding has already made a place for itself in several industries. These include automotive, offshore and ship building, aerospace, railways, personal computers, and various electronics. The future for this process is promising, paving a way for itself to maybe one day surpass traditional welding methods as the go to technique. If you would like to know more about friction stir welding, or other fabrication processes such as hydroforming, feel free to contact us at our website.