Posts Tagged tube hydroformers

Though Struggles Exist, Hydroforming and Metal Stamping Thrive

Though Struggles Exist, Hydroforming and Metal Stamping Thrive

U.S. manufacturing in the new tech age has brought with it many advances for those involved in the industries of metal stamping and hydroforming.

However, at the same time, it has continued to hinder growth across many industries, even though the dollar is strong, and the cost of oil per barrel is low.

For example, in states where manufacturing is intrinsically linked to automotive industry (like Ohio), there has been a strong showing, perhaps because of the industries tendency to diversify.

In Cleveland, according to a recent news article related to Cleveland manufacturing, companies like TimkinSteel Corp. and City Plating have been steady on the rise over the last few years.

As TimkinSteel Corp. spokesman, Joe Milicia, said in an email:

“We are feeling the effects of a strong dollar and a U.S. rig count that’s down more than 50-percent.”

So while many industries (in every state — not just Ohio) can pinpoint successes and failures throughout the year, the truth is that not every company sees a strong dollar as a bounty for growth.

Is hydroforming different?

Yes. Absolutely, in fact.

For those in the metal stamping and hydroforming industries, opportunities are abound. From things like LED and solar manufacturing in Ohio to automotive and aerospace in the Midwest, metal stamping and hydroforming adapt and advance.

Which, as the numbers will attest, prove that business is booming, and growth this year will lend to additional growth in the following years.

By continuing to focus on high-growth markets, hydroforming and metal stamping thrive in spite of negative factors that pervade other industries.

One could say that, growth is a slow-grind, but as long as there is formidable planning and need, manufacturers in the hydroforming sectors are verging on recession-proof.

For more information on how we can help you, please contact us any time.

Source Says: FEA Soon Available in the Cloud

Source Says: FEA Soon Available in the Cloud

According to a tech engineering firm known as Frame, CAD Windows apps, like FEA (Finite Element Analysis), can now be moved to the cloud, which will bring a hug change in how CAD operates.

From an article that outlines the subject:

The value of CAD systems for electronic envisioning of designs has been one of the most important drivers of what some call the post-industrial age.

CAD revolutionized the design industry, allowing fewer people than ever to render 2D and 3D objects. Significantly cutting down manpower.

CAD, as the article points out, is apart of the larger Digital Product Development (DPD), which is situated inside the Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) set of processes, which includes Finite Element Analysis (FEA) among others. It is, for the sake of design argument, the home base for how all design and planning begins.

CAD isn’t, as is probably no surprise, a set of systems that has made it to the cloud. Because of render computational speeds and a specialized set of codecs that need to be speedy in how they operate, CAD is relegated to localization. But Frame aims to change that.

As Frame’s website says: Frame is like Box, except instead of them delivering your documents via the cloud, they deliver your apps.

Apps that can be ran from an internal infrastructure, or from a cloud-based one, depending on your preferences.

But why CAD?

Because CAD needs it. According to Frame engineers, CAD is among the most demanding of all design programs, often requiring the most intense graphics, and a need for preserving and storing the highest quality of images.

It also boasts a compatibility with other Windows software, the key ability to host PDM or cloud storage, and a greater than stellar graphical performance.

All in all, having apps stored locally or in the cloud is a huge advancement for business and potential savings alike.

Those who are interested in taking it for a spin can sign up for a BETA at Frame’s website.

For more information on how we can help you, please don’t hesitate to contact us any time.

American Hydroformers, Inc. to be Featured on the Science Channel/Discovery Channel’s “How It’s Made” Television Program.

American Hydroformers, Inc. to be Featured on the Science Channel/Discovery Channel’s “How It’s Made” Television Program.

SUMMARY:

American Hydroformers is proud to announce that the company will be featured on a segment of the Science Channel/Discovery Channel’s popular “How It’s Made” television program. This detailed behind the scenes look at tube hydroforming chassis parts will be airing on the Science Channel in the US on Thursday, May 14th 2015 at 9:00pm (Eastern Time Zone).

 

Fort Wayne, IN–March 20, 2015-American Hydroformers, a leader in the tube hydroforming process, announced that the company and its hydroforming facilities will be featured on an upcoming episode of the Discovery Channels documentary television series “How It’s Made.” The segment will provide a compelling and comprehensive behind the scenes look at the tube hydroforming process. Viewers will be given the opportunity to see the hydroforming process for themselves as well as learn more information about the industry in general. The show will offer a step by step demonstration of the tube hydroforming process as well as an explanation of its uses and current industry examples. This informative segment will air on the Science Channel in the US on Thursday, May 14th 2015 at 9:00pm (Eastern Time Zone).

The Discovery Channels “How It’s Made” is a documentary television program that presents behind the scene perspective from factories and manufacturing facilities from around the world. The program demonstrates how raw materials and supplies are transformed into everyday objects. Shows range from typical household items to more complex manufacturing processes.

About American Hydroformers

Founded in 2003, American Hydroformers specializes in the tube hydroforming manufacturing process. Production capabilities include numerous metal forming techniques such as hydroforming, hydraulic press work, metal stamping, and tube forming. In addition to hydroformed components, American Hydroformers offers complete assembly level fabrication of automotive structures, robotic welding, and both industrial laser and plasma cutting.

To learn more about American Hydroformers products and services, visit their website at https://americanhydroformers.com/

How Hydroformed Components Make Products Better

How Hydroformed Components Make Products Better

Hydroformed components  and hydroforming positively impact how manufacturers produce. After all, hydroforming adapts to needs and makes lighter, more durable, and longer-lasting products, which benefit all of those who use them… whether they know they are or not.

For instance, take how car and truck companies use hydroforming. In many areas of the automobile, heavy parts made by traditional means weigh the car down; adding extra pounds creates drag and slows down acceleration.

But as hydroforming integral parts has become standard, car and truck manufacturers now use the seamless and more ductile components to benefit how new cars run.

The same situation applies to bicycle companies. Manufacturers of new super-terrain bikes, ones designed for optimum use and ware, are made with hydroformed frames and turning forks.

The seamless and lighter frame adds to the riders experience, not only in terms of handling, but also in how the bike’s tires grip and use whatever surface they are on.

With a hydroformed frame, the rider can feel individual rocks and crevices when it matters most. Perfect for professionals competing in rallies, and off-road riders who need to feel the ground below them for the sake of safety.

Hydorforming also finds its way into our kitchens, and many people are completely unaware of it. Tube hydrofroming is a popular way of producing kitchen fixtures and piping under the counters. Those sleek and beautiful fixtures that you see in hardware stores are most often made through hydroforming.

Hydroforming in plumbing, as a whole, allows for stronger parts with less weak spots for failure. Meaning no drips or leaks. For cars and bikes, it allows for lightweight, better performing rides, while improving performance and part durability.

In the end, hydroforming comes out on top as a key manufacturer and innovator. As the top producer of hydroformed parts in the Midwest, we are excited that we are a part of this growing industry.

For more information about hydroformed components or how we can help you, please contact us.

Aluminum Hydroforming Outperforming Steel Stamping

Aluminum Hydroforming Outperforming Steel Stamping

Hydroforming aluminum products has been around for the last few decades in some for or another. In the beginning, it was perfected to manufacture lightweight parts for the automotive industry as cars strayed away from heavier models and progressed towards more economical and efficient versions. But has since branched out to several other industries.

The advantages of aluminum hydroforming are numerous. Including weight reduction, vastly improved design flexibility, space reduction science, reduced jointing, less “downstream processing,” and a large impact on dimensional performance.

By replacing steel with aluminum, advanced hydroforming techniques could be applied to some of the most trusted and widely-used hydroforming methods. Aluminum sheeting, once added to the materials rotation, significantly impacted the stamping application, opening the door for advanced products and design. Then, as the automotive industry began to rapidly request more lightweight products, hydroforming adapted along side it.

As a basic rule that is typically agreed on by experts, and is used as an outline for aluminum hydroforming, there are three factors that contribute to the characteristics of aluminum extrusions.

They are:

Elongation: Most think that aluminum, being a lighter, more malleable material, would exhibit greater formable features than steel. This is contrary to the truth. In fact, steel is more formable than aluminum, but is obviously more weighty. Thus, the elongation factor is paramount to aluminum’s performance and usability over steel in addition to weight.

Materials: That is, alloys and tempers. Aluminum comes in a large variety of both of these characteristics, but the most widely sought after is a material that is strong and stable. Something that aluminum can have trouble with if close attention is not paid.

Shapes: A huge factor for aluminum’s growth in hydroforming is its ability to be formed into a large amount of shapes and sizes. Further, the cross sections that aluminum comes in out rivals steel in every regard (steel typically only comes in one: round).

Using aluminum in the hydroforming process has, and will continue to change how the technique is done. As major industries continue to evolve, so will how products are used, and how they benefit everyone involved.

For more information on how we can help you, please contact us any time.

What Is Tube Hydroforming? All you need to know.

What Is Tube Hydroforming? All you need to know.

Whether you are well-informed or brand-new to the subject, here is a primer on the basics of tube hydroforming. Read on to discover more about the process, the materials, the products, and the benefits.

Process

Simply put, hydroforming is the process of shaping ductile metals into desired pieces using either high or low pressure from hydraulic fluid. A hollow tube is placed into a negative mold, and fluid is pumped into the mold until the pressure shapes the material into the desired form. The fluid is removed and the product is finished.

Materials

Tube hydroforming can be done on metals including aluminum, brass, stainless steel, and low alloy steel.

Products

Tube hydroforming is used to make car frames, particularly high-end sports models. Specifially, engine cradles, suspension, radiator supports, and instrument panel beams are manufactured in this manner. Aluminum bicycle frames use this technology. And additionally, the brass tubes of Yamaha saxophones are made with this process.

Benefits

Tube hydroforming is desirable because it results in lightweight and structurally stiff products. The process is also very cost-effective, requiring few tools and minimal maintenance. Tube hydroforming provides an easy process for creating complex shapes, reducing the need for welding operations. Compared to other methods, tube hydroforming leaves a smooth finish and an appealing appearance.

American Hydroformers is based in Fort Wayne, IN, and specializes in the hydroform tube forming process. Whether you work in appliances, automotive, or plumbing fields, we are here to help you! Visit our “What Is Hydroforming” page to learn more about the process we use and see before and after photos.

Contact us today to request a quote and get more information about our services!