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Monthly archive for February 2015

Research Predicts Rising Future for Metal Hydroforming, Stamping, Forging, and Rolling

Research Predicts Rising Future for Metal Hydroforming, Stamping, Forging, and Rolling

The future of United States metallurgical manufacturing has never been more sound, according to a recent report on the ever-growing, ever-expanding billion dollar industry.

Tube hydroforming, metal stamping, forging, and rolling are all a part of a sound industry with a more than profitable and promising future. Metrics and analysis suggest that a measurable growth rate of metallurgy will save “countless hours of research,” thanks to key findings in the comprehensive research performed.

Key findings from the report:

– Metal Forging, Stamping, Rolling (and Powder Metallurgy Manufacturing) Industry (U.S.) to reach $49.6 billion by 2021.

– Metal Forging, Stamping, Rolling (and Powder Metallurgy Manufacturing) Industry, including Average EBITDA, Operating Ratios and Sales per Employee.

Along with expansion and growth, comes a list of benefits, which include many respectable positive features for employees and customers.

The research was carried out by Leggett & Platt Inc and Sypris Solutions Inc, et. al., and was featured on the Research and Markets website.

The metric data and analysis was carried out by several methods, designed to find core values of data and express it in terms of industry benchmarking, ratios, and vital statistics, so that owners and customers could see the findings alike.

Customers interested in how this affects them can read further into the report to find the core benefits, which include:

Comprehensive overview of an industry’s financial results… Complete benchmarking of the industry and its top companies…  Deep industry and company financials.

Key features of the report lead even deeper into the future of metallurgy, focusing heavily on future reports and money.

While those interested in adjusted financial information and futures can read further on operating ratios and “Deep profiles and financial histories/operating ratios for up to ten top U.S.-based companies.”

To read more, follow this link to discover the full text or simply read more on the overview we’ve outlined above.

For additional information on us and how we can help you, please contact us any time.

How Hydroformed Components Make Products Better

How Hydroformed Components Make Products Better

Hydroformed components  and hydroforming positively impact how manufacturers produce. After all, hydroforming adapts to needs and makes lighter, more durable, and longer-lasting products, which benefit all of those who use them… whether they know they are or not.

For instance, take how car and truck companies use hydroforming. In many areas of the automobile, heavy parts made by traditional means weigh the car down; adding extra pounds creates drag and slows down acceleration.

But as hydroforming integral parts has become standard, car and truck manufacturers now use the seamless and more ductile components to benefit how new cars run.

The same situation applies to bicycle companies. Manufacturers of new super-terrain bikes, ones designed for optimum use and ware, are made with hydroformed frames and turning forks.

The seamless and lighter frame adds to the riders experience, not only in terms of handling, but also in how the bike’s tires grip and use whatever surface they are on.

With a hydroformed frame, the rider can feel individual rocks and crevices when it matters most. Perfect for professionals competing in rallies, and off-road riders who need to feel the ground below them for the sake of safety.

Hydorforming also finds its way into our kitchens, and many people are completely unaware of it. Tube hydrofroming is a popular way of producing kitchen fixtures and piping under the counters. Those sleek and beautiful fixtures that you see in hardware stores are most often made through hydroforming.

Hydroforming in plumbing, as a whole, allows for stronger parts with less weak spots for failure. Meaning no drips or leaks. For cars and bikes, it allows for lightweight, better performing rides, while improving performance and part durability.

In the end, hydroforming comes out on top as a key manufacturer and innovator. As the top producer of hydroformed parts in the Midwest, we are excited that we are a part of this growing industry.

For more information about hydroformed components or how we can help you, please contact us.

High-Temperature Metal Gas Forming Burning Brightly

High-Temperature Metal Gas Forming Burning Brightly

Hydroforming is, arguably, one the most innovative methods for manufacturing of the last couple of decades. However, a similar yet just as important process known as high-temperature metal gas forming (HTMGF) has existed for nearly as long, and with similar benefits.

A few decades ago, when auto manufacturers wanted a lightweight, high strength but fully flexible part, they sought out hydroformers for the job.

As an alternative process to the mainstream, hydroforming eventually gained the popularity of design engineers, and not long after, hydroformed parts became a prominent means for design.

Then, as finite element analysis (FEA) software became more sophisticated, predictability in part production moved to the forefront, and parts were made in such a way that the receivers learned to expect a quality product that delivered consistency and reliability.

Not long after, however, high-temperature metal gas forming became a reality. Even if its rise is less well-known, its products are comparable, and some would argue, maybe even better in some ways.

Both tube hydroforming and HTMGF share many qualities. Both ways of production have their strengths and weaknesses, in terms of manufacturing and overall product strength. Both methods of production work similarly, and FEA software allows both to reap great advantages.

So which method is better? That’s a difficult question to answer. Each one appeals to different types of industries. While hydroforming is more well-known, HTMGF is slowly working itself towards the limelight.

In some ways, HTMGF is superior to hydroforming in terms of time needed to produce. Similar parts produced by the same method sometimes requires additional forming time.

As Dave Gearing points out in his incredibly in-depth article on the subject,

Choosing the optimal process often is a matter of considering both… early in the design stage when simple modifications to the part to aid the manufacturing process are easy to incorporate…

So while the jury is out, the debate continues as both methods become more nominal in their field.

For a deeper look at the finite schematics, extended benefits, methodology, and mathematics surrounding each process, check out this article on the subject, as mentioned above.

For more in how we can help you, please don’t hesitate to contact us.