Posts Tagged Ford F-150

Hydroformed Components Still Huge Part of Manufacturing

Hydroformed Components Still Huge Part of Manufacturing

We have long highlighted how hydroformed components are integral to manufacturers. From the kitchen sink to sports cars, hydroformed parts continue to lead the charge of innovation, and change how the modicum of industry performs.

Here are some of the latest examples of hydroformed parts making waves.

Kawasaki Ninja H2

The Kawasaki Ninja was one of the first street motorcycles to break speed records, and with recent launch of the $50k H2, Kawasaki is hoping to retain that relevancy and move into the future.

The hydroformed components: The exhaust system. “The entrance to the header pipes is oval to match the two exhaust ports per cylinder. Partly formed by hydroforming, each header pipe tapers from an oval to a round cross-section. The collector pipes are also hydroformed.”

Intense Tracer T275

The cycling industry has benefited greatly from hydroforming. Including top-of-the-line beasts like the Intense Tracer T275 to bottom of the barrel department store models.

The hydroformed components: The seamless top tube. This means that the frame weighs less because there are fewer parts involved with keeping the bike together. Resulting in a lighter, tougher frame and a smoother ride.

2015 Ford F-150

The automobile industry uses hydroformed parts daily. This includes large, multi-national companies like Ford. So when it was announced that the new F-150 would have hydroformed parts, we were both excited and relieved that they would be carrying on the tradition.

The hydroformed components: For increased bend-resistance, Ford’s F-150 has a heat-treated body and cab. “The cab’s structural cage is hydroformed and joints and seams are riveted and glued rather than welded. There’s more structural reinforcement between the inner and outer box and weight loss allowed Ford to up-gauge panel thickness as much as 65 percent.”

For more information on hydroforming and how we can help you, please don’t hesitate to contact us any time.

Aluminum Hydroforming Leaves Its Mark

Aluminum Hydroforming Leaves Its Mark

As automotive and mountain-biking companies begin to roll out sneak peeks at their 2015 lineups, it is becoming increasingly apparent just how much new advancements in hydroforming aluminum have affected both industries overall. This is pleasing because since aluminum is lighter than carbon and stainless steel, the use of hydroformed aluminium in car parts has opened new vistas of possibilities for increased effectiveness and decreased weight.

Take for example the 2015 lineup from the German biking company Merida. According to a recent article, next year’s lineup boasts more aluminium than ever, including a new Reacto aero bike featuring a very special frame:

The frame in question is made from hydroformed triple-butted 6066 aluminium with a tapered head tube and an integrated seat clamp like you’ll find on the carbon models. It looks like a high-quality piece of work in a very good grade of alloy (road.cc).

Looking beyond the world of cycling to the automotive realm, we see that Ford has certainly taken advantage of new opportunities provided by aluminum hydroforming.

Proof of this can be easily witnessed in their new 2015 line, which includes an all-aluminum body for its new F-150. In fact, the new F-150 was a recent spotlight by Ford’s purchasing chief Hau Thai-Tang, citing that the vehicle is the the first pickup with an aluminum body. As a result, it is on average about sixty pounds lighter. The F-150 still incorporates a steel frame, however, for improved rigidity (Auto News).

With new advancements being made all the time in the area of aluminium hydroforming, we look forward to many more companies taking advantage of these techniques to provide vehicles and machinery that are not only lighter and more durable but are also more cost-effective.

For more information about this or anything else, please feel free to contact us.

New Vehicles That Have Benefited from Hydroforming

New Vehicles That Have Benefited from Hydroforming

By now, you know that hydroforming is one of the most innovative and ground-breaking methods used to manufacture. Its meteoric rise to greatness has been documented by its progress to redefine how industries from all over the world produce. Something that can be seen most obviously in the automobile industry, where the hydroforming of parts has revolutionized everything from headliners to frames.

So in light of all of the modern uses of hydroforming, we thought we’d show you a few new vehicles that have benefited from hydroformed parts across the world.

2014 GMC Sierra HD: As GMC’s now “broadest truck,” engineers redesigned the Sierra HD with a huge, road-hugging wheelbase, wider front and rear tracks, and a powerful Vortec 6.0L V8 engine. But most impressive to us is the frame. The rigid design and use of high strength steel and a hydroformed front section for added lightness, makes the Sierra first in its class in towing capacity.

2015 Ford F-150: Not to be outdone by General Motors, Ford’s new F-150 aims to overtake the light truck industry by featuring, perhaps, the lightest constructed frame and body ever. Here’s how: the body, aluminum (first of its kind); parts of the frame, hydroformed for weight reduction. The new F-150 is still in pre-production, but engineers say there should be no delay on its release.

Ferrari LaFerrari F-12: For your hypercar enthusiasts, the latest from Ferrari offers throttle beyond your dreams: 950 horsepower. Oh, and the thing we’re proud of most, a hydroformed exhaust. A feature that no doubt gives the Italian hypercar less weight to contend with as it hurls itself around a track at 120 mph. Or as one writer said:

The noise, the excitement, the sheer, blistering speed, the spread of ability in being so usable on the road and such a missile on track. The LaFerrari is a triumph.

And hydroforming played a part.

For more information on hydroforming, and how we can help you, please don’t hesitate to contact us any time.