Posts Tagged american hydroforming

Two Musical Instruments with Hydroformed Components

Two Musical Instruments with Hydroformed Components

While most of us tend to associate hydroforming with the automotive and cycling worlds, other industries make good use of hydroformed components as well. The music industry is one of them. Apart from the aspect of electronics and amplification, certain instruments have hydroformed components as well. Two great examples of this are the steel drum and the alto saxophone.

Friction Stir Welding: Applications That Are Far Out and Close to Home

Friction Stir Welding: Applications That Are Far Out and Close to Home

Friction Stir Welding: Applications That Are Far Out and Close to Home. Liquid hydrogen, it’s a substance that has fascinated mankind since the 1800s. That’s when James Dewar unleashed it as well as his thoughts on vacuum flasks and regenerative cooling on to the world. At the time, many Americans were unsure about what liquid hydrogen could do but that would all change thanks primarily to NASA and its Centaur rockets. Although revolutionary, the upper stage rockets did pose a problem that until recently has continually vexed the government agency. It was one of tank integrity.

Tube Hydroforming vs. Sheet Hydroforming: What is Hydroforming?

Tube Hydroforming vs. Sheet Hydroforming: What is Hydroforming?

What is hydroforming? Hydroforming is when the force of water, hydraulic fluids, or oils is used to shape a single part. There are two types of hydroforming and each has uses when creating products from steel, aluminum, etc. Hydroforming, used in industries, creates parts without using welds. This makes a stronger part and sometimes a product is created from a single piece of metal. So, what are the two types of hydroforming? They are Tube Hydroforming and Sheet Hydroforming.

Do You Have A Process Control System For Your Metal Stamping Production?

Do You Have A Process Control System For Your Metal Stamping Production?

When you can control your manufacturing process, you will have a better chance of increasing your production, improving your quality, and reducing the overall costs. You need to have the right indicators when it comes to using a control system for your manufacturing needs because these indicators will have to be measured.  

What is Hydroforming?

What is Hydroforming?

What is hydroforming?  Hydroforming is an innovative method of pressing metal into the desired shape.  It produces results similar to cold forming, but instead of simply pressing the metal with a mold, it is pressed by liquid pressure.  Let’s be more specific about how it works.

Cold forming presses room temperature metal between a solid mold.  Hydroforming also presses metal at room temperature, but only the bottom half of the mold is present, underneath the raw metal.  The unit closes, creating a water tight seal around the metal and the mold, and then forces liquid into the unit through a hydraulic pump.  This forces the metal down into the mold.  The liquid is then released, and the newly formed metal reclaimed.

Many common metals can successfully undergo this process, including copper, brass, stainless steel, and aluminum.  This list is very similar to the metals that can be used with the traditional cold forming method.  Hydroforming is used to make all sorts of metal products, including satellite antennas, a tube for saxophones, bicycle frames, automobiles, and residential lighting materials.

The hydroforming method is particularly attractive because it can often be completed at a lower cost per unit than many other methods, including stamping or even wielding.  It can also produce a higher stiffness-to-weight ratio than many other methods.  Hydroforming is also beneficial because only half of the die is required.  Since the fluid acts as the other half, it’s only necessary to fabricate the bottom in most cases.  This also makes it much easier to change the thickness of the metal because there is no need to change the die.

Interested in learning more about Hydroforming and how it works?  Contact us.  We have all the answers, and we can help you with anything you need.

Though Struggles Exist, Hydroforming and Metal Stamping Thrive

Though Struggles Exist, Hydroforming and Metal Stamping Thrive

U.S. manufacturing in the new tech age has brought with it many advances for those involved in the industries of metal stamping and hydroforming.

However, at the same time, it has continued to hinder growth across many industries, even though the dollar is strong, and the cost of oil per barrel is low.

For example, in states where manufacturing is intrinsically linked to automotive industry (like Ohio), there has been a strong showing, perhaps because of the industries tendency to diversify.

In Cleveland, according to a recent news article related to Cleveland manufacturing, companies like TimkinSteel Corp. and City Plating have been steady on the rise over the last few years.

As TimkinSteel Corp. spokesman, Joe Milicia, said in an email:

“We are feeling the effects of a strong dollar and a U.S. rig count that’s down more than 50-percent.”

So while many industries (in every state — not just Ohio) can pinpoint successes and failures throughout the year, the truth is that not every company sees a strong dollar as a bounty for growth.

Is hydroforming different?

Yes. Absolutely, in fact.

For those in the metal stamping and hydroforming industries, opportunities are abound. From things like LED and solar manufacturing in Ohio to automotive and aerospace in the Midwest, metal stamping and hydroforming adapt and advance.

Which, as the numbers will attest, prove that business is booming, and growth this year will lend to additional growth in the following years.

By continuing to focus on high-growth markets, hydroforming and metal stamping thrive in spite of negative factors that pervade other industries.

One could say that, growth is a slow-grind, but as long as there is formidable planning and need, manufacturers in the hydroforming sectors are verging on recession-proof.

For more information on how we can help you, please contact us any time.

American Hydroformers Discusses the Heat Treating Process

American Hydroformers Discusses the Heat Treating Process

We have a lot of experience working with metal here at American Hydroformers, and a ton of experience in shaping the use of our products by clients. We also do out fair share of processing work. That is, how materials are turned into the end-product.

One such process that doesn’t get much exposure is how metals are heat treated. Every metal from stainless to aluminum, to even some exotic metals are heat treated to increase their strength and improve durability.

Industries that Use Heat Treating

Heat treating is used by a wide variety of markets.

Aerospace

Auto manufacturers

Lighting solution companies

Cookware manufacturers

The Defense Department

Medical and surgical instruments

Heavy and industrial equipment

Two Types of Heat Treating

The heat treating process is broken into two distinct categories:

Vacuum Heat Treating: Ideal for ferrous metals, like steel, bronze, and brass. The vacuum is airless, and burns a fine layer of metal off the surface of the treated material. This gives the product a beautiful and strong finish made to last the life of the product.

Aluminum Heat Treating: Oftentimes aluminum parts require additional treatment. A variety of processes, like annealing, stress relieving, glycol quenching, case hardening, precipitation strengthening, and tempering, are performed depending on the customer’s requirements.

How it Works

The process alters the physical (and sometimes chemical) makeup of the treated metal in a way that doesn’t change its shape. Extreme heat is most often used to increase the toughness of a product, but it can also be used after the hydorforming or deep draw processes to restore a metal’s ability to deform under tensile stress (so re-shaping is possible).

For more information on how we can help you, please contact us any time.

Source Says: FEA Soon Available in the Cloud

Source Says: FEA Soon Available in the Cloud

According to a tech engineering firm known as Frame, CAD Windows apps, like FEA (Finite Element Analysis), can now be moved to the cloud, which will bring a hug change in how CAD operates.

From an article that outlines the subject:

The value of CAD systems for electronic envisioning of designs has been one of the most important drivers of what some call the post-industrial age.

CAD revolutionized the design industry, allowing fewer people than ever to render 2D and 3D objects. Significantly cutting down manpower.

CAD, as the article points out, is apart of the larger Digital Product Development (DPD), which is situated inside the Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) set of processes, which includes Finite Element Analysis (FEA) among others. It is, for the sake of design argument, the home base for how all design and planning begins.

CAD isn’t, as is probably no surprise, a set of systems that has made it to the cloud. Because of render computational speeds and a specialized set of codecs that need to be speedy in how they operate, CAD is relegated to localization. But Frame aims to change that.

As Frame’s website says: Frame is like Box, except instead of them delivering your documents via the cloud, they deliver your apps.

Apps that can be ran from an internal infrastructure, or from a cloud-based one, depending on your preferences.

But why CAD?

Because CAD needs it. According to Frame engineers, CAD is among the most demanding of all design programs, often requiring the most intense graphics, and a need for preserving and storing the highest quality of images.

It also boasts a compatibility with other Windows software, the key ability to host PDM or cloud storage, and a greater than stellar graphical performance.

All in all, having apps stored locally or in the cloud is a huge advancement for business and potential savings alike.

Those who are interested in taking it for a spin can sign up for a BETA at Frame’s website.

For more information on how we can help you, please don’t hesitate to contact us any time.